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20110701
20110731
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night between front line troops in afghanistan and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen who's visiting them this weekend. somewhat unbelievably, several u.s. troops said their major concern was not getting paid because of this budget fight in washington. in response, mullen was blunt. he said it would be devastating. well, today our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski followed up in an exclusive conversation with admiral mullen. >> reporter: brian, admiral mullen fully expected to talk to the soldiers and marines about the war here in afghanistan. not the one in washington. >> they weren't talking about afghanistan. they weren't talking about the fight they were in. this isn't surprising, but when you're deployed you want to make sure everything's okay at home. >> soldiers and marines in the middle of a war zone worrying about getting paid. >> they always worry about getting paid. they just sort of expect it to happen. >> reporter: you said that if, in fact, paychecks were held up, that many in the services would be devastated by missing a single paycheck
died in iraq and afghanistan in tonight's making a difference report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars and have joined forces to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own healing, taryn began reaching out to other widows. but talking alone wasn't enough. soon,
to iraq and afghanistan before but never as defense secretary, that happened this weekend, he's only been on the job for 11 days and already those traveling with him say there's been an unmistakable change at the top at the pentagon. jim miklaszewski is traveling with him and tonight has an exclusive interview with the secretary. >> reporter: the new secretary of defense leon panetta surveyed iraq from a u.s. military helicopter today and was trou e troubled by the landscape below. troops scheduled to withdraw by the end of the are caught up again in the war. panetta told a gathering of soldiers today the killing must end. >> my first responsibility as secretary of defense is to make damned sure that we do everything necessary to protect you. >> reporter: panetta pressured iraq's top officials to send iraqi military officials out to hunter down attackers. in an interview with nbc news, he said if not, american combat forces would do the job. >> all i can tell you is i do have the authority and the responsibility to defend u.s. soldiers. >> reporter: this is panetta's second trip to visit
gets paid and what doesn't. that's causing anxiety from wall street to the battle fields of afghanistan. as the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, discovered for himself today, nbc's jim wikachenski is traveling with him. >> reporter: here at the hot spots of kandahar, american soldiers and marines are still dodging bullets, rockets and road side bombs every day. amazingly, when they had a chance to throw questions at the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, their number one concern was the ongoing debate back home over the debt ceiling. >> the checkbook is not unlimited. >> reporter: admiral mullen told soldiers at kandahar that if the talks failed they'd still have to fight but they might not get paid. >> there are plenty of you that are living paycheck to paycheck. so if paychecks were to stop, it can have a devastating impact and it can have a devastating impact pretty quickly. >> reporter: at camp leatherneck, mullen told marines given the state of the u.s. economy, all the services face a cutback in the size of the force, and maybe e
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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